Cinnamon

Cinnamomum zeylanicum
Lauraceae
cinnamon bark in a spice market
cinnamon bark in a spice market
Your plants are an orchard of pomegranates with choice fruits, with henna and nard, nard and saffron, calamus and cinnamon, with every kind of incense tree, with myrrh and aloes and all the finest spices.
Song of Songs 4:13-14
cinnamon bark in a spice market
Then the Lord said to Moses, “Take the following fine spices: 500 shekels of liquid myrrh, half as much (that is, 250 shekels) of fragrant cinnamon, 250 shekels of fragrant calamus, 500 shekels of cassia—all according to the sanctuary shekel—and a hin of olive oil. Make these into a sacred anointing oil, a fragrant blend, the work of a perfumer. It will be the sacred anointing oil.
Exodus 30:22-25

Cultural Information

TypeEdible Tree
Height30 feet
Soilwell-drained, acidic soil best
Exposurefull to part sun
Leavesdark, evergreen, oblong
Flowerssmall, creamy white, appear in mid-spring to summer
Fruitinedible, dark berries

Planting Tips

  • Zone 10
  • Cinnamon is a tropical plant grown mostly in Southern India and Ceylon
  • Powdered spice is made from the inner bark of the trunk and branches
  • Grow as a container plant for novelty in the home garden, bring indoors in winter

Garden to Table

  • cinnamon is a common luxury, an exotic spice found abundantly in markets and baking recipes
  • flavor muffins, quickbreads, pies, cookies, and cakes with cinnamon
  • enjoy cinnamon sticks as garnish in hot cocoa, mulled cider, spiced coffee, tea, and lattes
  • add a dusting of cinnamon atop a swirl of whipped cream to warm drink or dessert
  • cinnamon-scented pot pourri infuses a room with thoughts of the holidays and home-baking
  • cinnamon sticks lend themselves easily to crafts and table decorations

Additional Resources

See Blog Posts on Cinnamon
Though in common use today, cinnamon obtained by Moses for the anointing oil of the tabernacle would have been costly and precious. The delicious smell of cinnamon can remind us of the lavish gift we have in God’s unfailing love.
-from the NIV God's Word for Gardeners Bible
cinnamon bark in a spice market
Then the Lord said to Moses, “Take the following fine spices: 500 shekels of liquid myrrh, half as much (that is, 250 shekels) of fragrant cinnamon, 250 shekels of fragrant calamus, 500 shekels of cassia—all according to the sanctuary shekel—and a hin of olive oil. Make these into a sacred anointing oil, a fragrant blend, the work of a perfumer. It will be the sacred anointing oil.
Exodus 30:22-25

Photo Credits

© Aluha | Dreamstime.com Cinnamon sticks in an Indian market, December 2012
© Michael Poe | Dreamstime.com Cinnamon tree leaves with some new shoots. The cinnamon spice we eat actually comes from the dried bark of the tree.
© 2014 Shelley S. Cramm Baking with cinnamon, a common delight!
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